Tuesday, 27 September 2016

How is Untapped Creativity in Organizations Valuable? It's Buried ROI

It’s not easy to use an equation model to evaluate the validity of creative potential versus practiced creativity, but Creative Potential and Practised Creativity - Identifying Untapped Creativity in Organizations shows you exactly how this can be done inside your organization by quantifying several necessary practices and provides a managerial guide to tapping this resources within a company.




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Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Deisgn & Innovation are Discontinuous and Yes, there is a way to harness it.

Exploratory units are an important aspect of an innovation team and Enhancing Discontinuous Innovation defines a definitive description of what these units entail. Through a case study of an exploratory unit in an automotive firm, the concept of the unit is defined along with the role of its members and the way they communicate their ideas.



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Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Interview with Gregory Polletta for The iGNITE Convergence Program @ Northeastern University Boston

On Tue., Sept 13th @ 12 noon Gregory Polletta will give the 1hr pre-iGNITE lecture series on Design & Innovation at Northeastern University Boston. The 1st of it's kind, this lunch time campus wide 1hr lecture series is sponsored by Northeastern University's President office, The College of Engineering and Northeastern Design.


In conjunction with the above and in a 4 part, 4 country, interview series, Professor Polletta is this time interviewed by Eric Howard Corporate and Outreach Manager for Northeastern’s Center for High-Rate Nano Manufacturing. Gregory describes some of the challenges and successes of integrating radical design, unproven engineering and R&D Design Thinking techniques executed at some of the worlds largest firms and some of the most nimble international startups.

Tuesday's Sept 13th, one hour lecture series is part of iGNITIATE's internationally renowned iGNITE Convergence Program this time being delivered at Northeastern University's College of Engineering on Friday Sept 16 - Sunday Sept 18th in conjunction with the National Science Foundation and Northeastern's Center for High Rate Nano Manufacturing. 


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Tuesday, 6 September 2016

Richard Branson Gets Design. Does your firm?

Why is design not synonymous with the America's? Why is it not as important as in Europe and why are branded international design super stars, not likely to ring with an American name?


Recently at an meeting with senior level managers at a large USA based multinational firm, the question was asked, which of these names do you recognize: Picasso, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Phillippe Starck, Charles Eames, Frank Gehry, Giorgio Armani, and about 10 others. The overwhelming score, less than 30%. Then the women in the room were asked. The score jumped to over 80%. When the names of contemporary international designers were added again, the scores where minuscule, yet again, the women scored significantly higher. Why? 

In a recent interview Richard Branson details some of the reasons why design matter and who he's working with. Can the CEO and C-Level executives at your firm say the same? How embedded is the design process in how your firm conceptualizes, and launches new products? And clearly, are they any where near as integrated and sexy as Virgin? Just take a look at the typical interiors of their planes, trains and of course advertising. 


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